An Archaeology of Elmina: Africans and Europeans on the Gold Coast, 1400-1900. Christopher R. DeCorse. 2001. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Contributed by: Kofi Nutor

This book discussed archaeological research in Elmina where the first European trade post in the Gold Coast (now Ghana) was constructed during the trans-Atlantic era. Using data from a phethora of sources including archaeological excavations, oral traditions and written historical documents, DeCorse examined African-European interactions in Elmina, a major West African coastal trade hub where European manufactured goods such as firearms, tobacco pipes, glass and ceramic wares, wine and liquor (as gleaned from the archaeological record) were exchanged for African goods such as gold and other raw materials, as well as slaves that were sent to plantations in the New World from C15th to the C19th. Various aspects of the life ways of the people of Elmina including subsistence strategies, burial practices and religious rites, settlement patterning and local trade were discussed within the broader context of Trans-Atlantic contact in Ghana.