Rediscovering Ghana’s Past. James Anquandah. 1982. Hallow, Essex: Longman.

Contributed by: Kofi Nutor

In this book, Anquandah used data from various archaeological research, written and oral history and ethnography to provide a general understanding of Ghana’s past from the Early Stone Age to the era of colonialism. Commencing with an introduction to archaeological theory and practice, Anquandah went on to discuss the beginnings of archaeological education and research in Ghana. The archaeological and ethnoarchaeological data on hunter- gatherers of the early stone age, through to the beginnings of farming and village life, the emergence of metallurgy, to the rise of early urban centres and kingdoms in Northern Ghana, the Akan area, and the Accra plains were discussed. The effects of external contacts such as the trans-Saharan and trans-Atlantic contacts on various aspects of the history of different socio-cultural groups in Ghana were discussed. Contributions made by Ghana to other cultures of the world were briefly presented.